Castlecoote House

Sporting activities or events School visits or programmes Park or garden open Open to pre-booked groups (minimum 6) Open to individuals Open for overnight accommodation with dinner Cultural activities or events Courses for adults Available for weddings Available for functions or corporate events Available as a film location

Castlecoote House, Castlecoote , Roscommon, Ireland

t: +353 9066 63794
e: info@castlecootehouse.com
w: http://www.castlecootehouse.com

The House

Castlecoote was originally a mediaeval castle guarding a strategic crossing of the River Suck, possibly built by the McGerraghty family from nearby Fuerty.

The castle was given to Charles Coote, a successful soldier in the wars at the end of Queen Elizabeth's reign, in 1614. Coote fought at the Battle of Kinsale in 1602 and had a long and successful career, becoming Vice President of Connaught and the premier Irish baronet, with estates in five counties before he was killed fighting in the Rebellion of 1641. He improved and refortified the original castle, which was attacked three times by Confederate forces, and renamed it Castle Coote.

By the second half of the seventeenth century the castle had fallen into ruins and a new dwelling was built within the walls. The unsettled times required houses to be easily defensible and the pistol loops which covered the entrance can still be seen in the two end turrets.

In the early 18th century Castlecoote passed into the hands of the Gunning family, who reputedly won the estate at cards. John Gunning’s beautiful daughters were “the celebrated Gunning Sisters” and the toast of 1750s London. They began their careers as actresses (then far from a respectable profession) and stunned Society when the elder sister married the Duke of Hamilton and, after his death, the even wealthier Duke of Argyll. She was the mother of four dukes while her younger sister married the Earl of Coventry. 

Later in the 18th century the 1680s house was remodeled in the Palladian style and given an elaborate neo-classical interior but despite their powerful connections the Gunning family returned to relative obscurity.

Castlecoote House then changed hands with increasing frequency. By the early 20th century the owner was the noted equestrian, Henry D. Stevens but the house was subsequently abandoned and became ruinous.

In 1997, when bought by the present owner, Kevin Finnerty, Castlecoote House was a cavernous ruin, without floors, stairs or windows while the internal walls were crumbling away. The basement was enveloped by earth, the front doorsteps had collapsed, and the surroundings were badly overgrown.

He began a lengthy period of restoration, which took five years to complete. Work included essential structural work, such as re-roofing, underpinning the foundations, and consolidating the castle towers, and more intricate work such as restoring the plaster ceilings, replacing the chimneypieces, the internal doors and other joinery, and completely redecorating the interior. 

Castlecoote House is attractively sited on a bend of the River Suck, on the west bank of the river just north of Castlecoote village and about five miles due west of Roscommon town. The view from the house is framed by the ruined towers of the castle and the remains of an early mill.   

Information

Sporting activities or events

School visits or programmes

Park or garden open

Open to pre-booked groups (minimum 6)

Open to individuals

Open for overnight accommodation with dinner

Cultural activities or events

Courses for adults

Available for weddings

Available for functions or corporate events

Available as a film location

Opening Hours

2pm - 6pm, Wednesday to Sunday or by appointment.

01st May - 30th September