Tourin

Sporting activities or events School visits or programmes Park or garden open Open to pre-booked groups (minimum 6) Open to individuals Open only to pre-booked groups (minimum 6) Cultural activities or events Courses for adults Available for functions or corporate events Available as a film location

Tourin, Cappoquin, Waterford, Ireland

t: 00 353 5854405
e: tourin@eircom.net
w: http://www.tourin.ie

The House

The Tourin estate was owned by the Roche family in the 17th century, passed to a family called Nettles and was purchased by Sir Richard Musgrave, MP for Lismore and sheriff of County Waterford, in 1778.

In 1801 Musgrave published his Memoirs of the Different Rebellions in Ireland, from the Arrival of the English, with Particular Detail of that which Broke out the 23d May 1798; with the History of the Conspiracy that Proceeded it, and the Characters of the Principal Actors in it. Compiled from Original Affidavits and Other Authentic Documents. Musgrave's somewhat partial view of events was a source of much amusement. Sir Jonah Barrington joked that he “was generally in his senses…. except on the abstract topics of politics, religion, martial law, his wife, the Pope, the Pretender, the Jesuits, Naper Tandy, and the whipping-post" but the work is now accepted as an important primary source.

The family lived in a 17th century E-shaped dwelling with gables and tall chimneys, attached to the mediaeval tower of Tourin Castle, until the 3rd baronet decided to build a new house on a more elevated site above the River Blackwater.

Finished in 1841, the new Tourin House is a handsome Italianate villa in what would then have been the very latest style, possibly to the designs of the Waterford architect Abraham Denny. There are four formal fronts, all rendered and with beautifully crisply cut stone details. These include an elaborate cornice, which supports the overhanging eaves, and a profusion of quoins and stringcourses.

The five bay façade has a pair of projecting porches at both ends, both single storey and framed with limestone pilasters, which in turn flank an arcade of three round-headed windows.  The remaining fronts are mainly of four bays, though the ground floor of the rear facade is of five bays with a delicate bowed iron verandah while the garden front has a more robust single storey central bow.

Internally, Tourin is largely unaltered, with a splendid bifurcating imperial staircase of oak, which arises behind the hall. 

The elder daughter of the 5th baronet inherited Tourin. She married Thomas Jameson and their granddaughters live in the house today.

The five acre gardens were laid out at the beginning of the 20th century by Richard Musgrave, with the help of his friend the Cork brewer Richard Beamish. The fine collection of rhododendrons, camellias, and magnolias are the creation of his grandson and his wife (the present owners' parents) while a number of mature oak and cedar trees, and a Champion London plane, remain from the earlier garden and parkland layout. 

The walled garden produces fruit, vegetables, herbs and cut flowers, and is home to an important collection of over a hundred bearded irises – which flower in May and June.

Information

Sporting activities or events

School visits or programmes

Park or garden open

Open to pre-booked groups (minimum 6)

Open to individuals

Open only to pre-booked groups (minimum 6)

Cultural activities or events

Courses for adults

Available for functions or corporate events

Available as a film location

Opening Hours

April to September

Tuesday to Saturday

1.00pm to 5.00pm